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Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues, and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/fall-2017 for more information.

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Sunday, December 10
 

3:00pm

 
Monday, December 11
 

8:30am

11:00am

Registration Opens
Monday December 11, 2017 11:00am - TBA
Blue Pre-function

11:30am

Orientation for First-time Attendees
Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 11:30am - 12:15pm
Executive Room

12:15pm

Break
Monday December 11, 2017 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Blue Pre-function

1:15pm

Opening Plenary: 2017 in Review and 2018 in Prospect
This plenary presentation will look at key developments that the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) has been tracking over the past year, highlight some specific emerging developments that we believe to be of particular importance, and summarize CNI’s 2017-2018 Program Plan.
https://www.cni.org/program/

Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Blue Room

2:15pm

Break
Monday December 11, 2017 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Blue Pre-function

2:30pm

Academic Preservation Trust: The Three-Year Report
Planning for the Academic Preservation Trust consortium began five years ago, and APTrust introduced its digital preservation repository as a production service three years ago. With many technical improvements, a solid financial base, and accelerating rates of deposit, APTrust presents a picture of a collaboration in excellent health. But, is it? Why are some members not currently depositing content? How well does it fit the individual digital preservation strategies of all of its members? Those are some of the questions that the governing board and the members of APTrust decided to explore in the fall of 2017. Staff and member representatives will report on the results of that exploration, the emerging patterns of use of APTrust, and its directions for the future.
http://aptrust.org/

Speakers
PC

Paul Clough

Digital Architect and Infrastructure Librarian, University of Miami
avatar for Bradley Daigle

Bradley Daigle

Strategic and Content Expert, APTrust, APTrust/University of Virginia
University of Virginia
avatar for Chip German

Chip German

Program Director, APTrust, and Senior Director, Content Stewardship/Scholarly Communication, UVA Library, APTrust/University of Virginia
APTrust, University of Virginia Library
avatar for Salwa Ismail

Salwa Ismail

Head, Library Information Technology, Georgetown University
Portfolio: library servers, systems, and applications; computing infrastructure; web, digital & data scholarship, initiatives & services; ILS & discovery services || 2014 ecampus news' “11 leaders shaping the future of higher education." || 2015 Library Mover and Shaker by Libr... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Senate

2:30pm

Archival Collections, Open-Linked Data, and Multi-modal Storytelling
Narrative and dialogue are good ways of engaging people and helping people understand and memorize information. Yet evolution, innovation, and history are typically documented in a chronological manner, with their associated processes set sequentially through a series of highlighted events filtered from a myriad of interactions that ultimately lead to the culminating event. Institutional archives consisting of photographs, drawings, manuscripts, and physical artifacts are often sorted and cataloged using similar chronological methodologies. In this project, we demonstrate a digital platform for people to create and share multimodal interactive stories. In particular, this demonstration will show how restructuring the metadata and presentation layer for digital library archives can enhance the research and narrative connections latent within archival collections. The demonstration will also illustrate the power and flexibility of agent-driven multimodal storytelling.

Speakers
MS

Mei Si

Associate Professor, Cognitive Science Department, Cognitive and Immersive Systems Lab, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
AW

Andrew White

Director, Libraries and Web Services, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Embassy

2:30pm

bepress and Elsevier: Let's Go There
This summer's news of Elsevier acquiring bepress shocked the community and prompted questions about the future of both companies. While some bepress customers are excited about what this means for the development and longevity of the platform, others have concerns that the service model and culture of bepress will be lost. In this session, Jean-Gabriel Bankier, Managing Director of bepress, will address these reactions head-on. He will outline bepress's unchanged business, support, and service model, and plans for product improvements. He will also discuss the ways that bepress is working with Elsevier to change the conversation around open access and the library's value on campus. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the transition from the inside, as well as what it means for customers and the larger community.

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Managing Director, bepress
IR success metrics and bench marking | Faculty profiles | Author readership dashboards


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Executive Room

2:30pm

Bridge2Hyku: Developing Migration Strategies
The University of Houston (UH) Libraries, in partnership and consultation with numerous institutions, was awarded an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership/Project Grant to support the creation of the Bridge2Hyku (B2H) Toolkit. Focusing on general information and guides for migration as well as on specific content for migrating to the Hyku platform, the toolkit will help institutions better understand their digital library ecosystems and how they can prepare for migration. This presentation will offer background information on the ecosystems, workflows, and tools, collectively known as the Bayou City Digital Asset Management System (BCDAMS), implemented at the UH Libraries. The presenters will outline the key phases that make up the IMLS funded B2H Toolkit project plan. They will also discuss how the project engages and strengthens the open source Samvera Community (formerly Hydra Community) around Hyku by leveraging our collective expertise through strategic collaboration.
https://www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/lg-70-17-0217-17

Speakers
avatar for Santi Thompson

Santi Thompson

Head of Digital Research Services, University of Houston
University of Houston
AW

Annie Wu

Head of Metadata and Digitization Services, University of Houston


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Calvert

2:30pm

Data Science in Libraries: Findings and a Roadmap Forward
Data Science in Libraries is an Institute of Museum and Library Services funded National Forum grant that convened an international workshop in May of 2017. Drawing on the expertise of workshop participants, the group created a report and a roadmap to integrate data science in libraries. This presentation provides the findings from the report and brings a discussion about data science in libraries to the CNI community.


http://datascienceinlibraries.org/

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University
avatar for Bonnie Tijerina

Bonnie Tijerina

Researcher/ President, Data & Society/ ER&L
Bonnie Tijerina is a librarian, entrepreneur and library community convener. She is currently a Data & Society Fellow at the Data & Society Institute in New York City. She is founder of ER&L (Electronic Resources & Libraries) conference and organization, created to facilitate com... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Blue Room

2:30pm

Integration of Information Technology in a Building that Marries Library and Classroom: Purdue's Wilmeth Active Learning Center
The Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) opened on the Purdue campus on August 21, with the start of the Fall Semester. The WALC is a building that marries the traditional functions of a library and a classroom, by including such traditional elements as a reading room and stack space with library study space distributed throughout the building. The 27 classrooms are designed for active learning with a variety of seating types around tables to enable and enhance collaborative learning, coupled with state of art technology to facilitate the learning experience. Once the class day ends, the classrooms become available for use by students as individual or group study, thereby increasing the efficiency of the building. The response to the WALC has been overwhelming. Students are asking to have it expanded!


https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2017/Q3/wilmeth-active-learning-center-to-offer-advanced-learning-environment.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhX8kV1SbDs
https://www.bsalifestructures.com/project/wilmeth-active-learning-center

Speakers
JL

James L. Mullins

Dean of Libraries and Esther Ellis Norton Professor, Purdue University


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Congressional B

2:30pm

Open Educational Resources and the Black Press in America Project
The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Press, Project MUSE and the JHU Sheridan Libraries are developing a novel set of open educational resources through the Black Press in America Project. Led by Professor Kim Gallon of Purdue University, a group of scholars is developing educational resources based on an examination of historical and current African-American newspapers. By focusing on the workflows between people, processes, and products, this group of authors is working iteratively with both a publisher and a library to develop peer-reviewed print books, open-access monographs hosted on the MUSE platform, and a set of associated digital resources hosted by the Sheridan Libraries. By adopting this approach, we are simultaneously respecting and extending existing workflows to balance sustainability, innovation, and global distribution. Rather than adopt the familiar process of defining requirements at the beginning of the development effort, the Black Press in America Project features a more dynamic approach that explicitly considers opportunities for developing and connecting print books, open-access monographs, and digital resources. Examples include the use of Omeka to collect digital content from authors and to create digital exhibits over time that might generate ongoing interest in the books. Additionally, through the use of an Omeka plug-in for the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF), we will import IIIF resources for digital exhibits and expose those IIIF resources through third-party viewers. Finally, the Sheridan Libraries have developed an IIIF viewer and linked data capabilities that will be used to connect the various print and digital resources into a set of open educational resources. The challenge of building this type of seamless connectivity is mitigated through the iterative development process including authors, press, and library. The presenters will describe the process through which this project formed and demonstrate prototype capabilities.
muse.jhu.edu

Speakers
avatar for Greg Britton

Greg Britton

Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
WQ

Wendy Queen

Director, Project MUSE, Johns Hopkins University


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Congressional A

2:30pm

The 2.5% Commitment Initiative
The "2.5% Commitment" initiative grew out of a paper by the same name written by David Lewis. It argues that additional contributions from academic libraries are required for infrastructure to support the open scholarly commons and encourages academic libraries to contribute 2.5% of their total budget to support open infrastructure and content. Establishing a norm of this sort is required to overcome the collective action problem libraries currently face. The first step in establishing this norm is to define what counts as "open infrastructure and content" and to create a tool that would allow academic libraries to measure their contribution in a uniform way. Unsurprisingly, this is not simple. This presentation will review the proposal in the Lewis paper and will describe initial efforts to define "open infrastructure and content." It will also review the preliminary application of this common methodology across 20-30 academic libraries. This will show both how this group of libraries supports open infrastructure and content and to what extent a 2.5% commitment is a realistic or an aspirational goal.
https://scholarworks.iupui.edu/handle/1805/14063
scholarlycommons.net

Speakers
LG

Lori Goetsch

Dean of Libraries, Kansas State University
DL

David Lewis

Dean of the Library, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
avatar for Michael D. Roy

Michael D. Roy

Dean of the Library, Middlebury College
I'm interested in talking with people at this conference about the intersections of librarianship, academic technology, open access publishing, digital scholarship, and how all of these inform 21st century visions of digital learning, and emerging forms of literacy.


Monday December 11, 2017 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Governor’s

3:15pm

Break
Monday December 11, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Blue Pre-function

3:45pm

Always Already Computational: Collections as Data
Collections as Data is an Institute of Museum and Library Services supported effort that aims to create a framework and set of deliverables that guide cultural heritage professionals in the development, description, and provisioning of collections that are amenable to computational analysis. Project deliverables are designed to be helpful to institutions with a wide range of resources at hand, from large museums and academic institutions to small cultural heritage organizations. To date, the project has hosted a national forum (with plans for a second), collected and developed use cases, created personas that span library staff and end-users, and hosted sold-out project workshops at a wide range of disciplinary and professional conferences. Enthusiastic community participation in project deliverable development has been integral to success. More broadly, the growth of internationally distributed collections as data branded events, curricula, and job descriptions suggests that collections as data provides a conceptual motivation with increasing currency. Collections as data challenges all aspects of an organization to think of digital collections as more than surrogates of physical objects - to consider the ways in which an object become data affords the capacity to support new questions. The consequence of this orientation calls into question current library configurations of people and resources and creates an imperative for thinking differently. Always Already Computational seeks to engage library leaders in a conversation about the meaning and potential utility of collections as data in their local context. In order to set the stage for this conversation, project leads will share work completed to date on the project born of collaboration with institutions large and small. Products include an advocacy deliverable (The Santa Barbara Statement on Collections as Data), an implementation deliverable (Collections as Data Facets), and a development deliverable (Collections as Data Personas and Use Cases). With these three deliverables in hand we hope to garner conversation with library leaders that strengthens the utility of the project for library use writ large. We also hope that the conversation serves to encourage further project deliverable development from session participant institutions.


https://collectionsasdata.github.io/

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Hannah Frost

Hannah Frost

Manager, Digital Library Product and Service Management, Stanford University
Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Thomas Padilla

Thomas Padilla

Visiting Digital Research Services Librarian, University of Nevada Las Vegas
Collections as Data, Digital Scholarship, Digital Humanities, Humanities data, data curation, and data information literacy. Tacos.


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Governor’s

3:45pm

Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Library
This session will explore how artificial intelligence (AI) is used and how it is going to be deployed in the library, museum, and archives fields. The presentation will include an exploration of new AI opportunities using current and future projects, discussion of opening an interdisciplinary AI lab in a library (the first of its kind in the United States), and the description of how an AI-based framework is mimicking the way human brains absorb information and create dynamic knowledge.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Boughida

Karim Boughida

Dean of University Libraries, University of Rhode Island
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University
avatar for Ruth Pickering

Ruth Pickering

Co-Founder and Chief Strategy and Business Development Officer, Yewno
Ruth has worked for both blue-chip corporations and startups and has extensive experience across product development, program management and strategy. With experience as a managing director of large organizations, Pickering has managed both strategic planning and execution of mul... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Congressional B

3:45pm

CANCELLED: Leaving the Teenage Years Behind: Internet Identity Comes of Age
Internet identity has been worked for almost a full generation now. Its importance has grown, creating new legal domains; its scope has grown, becoming as ubiquitous as the Internet itself; its vexations persist, from identity theft to privacy spills. This presentation will highlight significant markers on the path through the teenage years, but focus even more on the current activities that are marking both the transition of Internet identity to more maturity and the return of the cutting edge to its original roots in research and education. These activities include enabling new forms of discovery services, the adoption of two-step authentication, responding to GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and PSD2 (the second Payment Services Directive) requirements, building user-effective fine-grain controls for attribute release and privacy management, federated incident handling, and increasing the basic baselines of trust within the community. The talk will conclude, as often, with a set of fearless and frequently wrong predictions.

Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
TBA

3:45pm

Developing the Scholarly Communication Ecosystem: A CMU Perspective
Participants attending the CNI Executive Roundtable held in April 2017 produced a report capturing ways of rethinking and implementing strategies surrounding institutional repositories. During the past year, the University Libraries (UL) of Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have begun to implement an ambitious vision for the future of research at CMU, which includes a commitment to curating the data, publications, software, and other products, tools, and workflows of the research process. To achieve this, the UL has been developing a resource-intensive scholarly communications infrastructure built and managed around an interconnected Current Research Information System (CRIS) and a new comprehensive institutional repository (IR) powered by the figshare platform. This presentation will address the development of the CRIS/IR centered scholarly communications infrastructure and the challenges that the UL has discovered in implementing an IR to serve as an "enterprise repository" for students, faculty, and administrators. It will also focus on the ways in which this new ecosystem has organizationally transformed the UL to become campus-wide champions of new forms of scholarly communications and dedicated stakeholders in the research life cycle at CMU.
https://kilthub.cmu.edu/
http://library.cmu.edu/kilthub/about

Speakers
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
OV

Ole Villadsen

Research Liaison, Cybersecurity and Information Systems, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Dean of University Libraries, and Director of Emerging and Integrative Media Initiatives, Carnegie Mellon University
Keith Webster was appointed Dean of University Libraries at Carnegie Mellon in July 2013 and to the additional role of Director of Emerging and Integrative Media Initiatives two years later. He is a Professor in the University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Policy. Ke... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Blue Room

3:45pm

Ensuring Access to Culturally Significant, At-Risk, Audiovisual Recordings: The EMI Music Canada Archive
In 2016, Libraries and Cultural Resources at the University of Calgary acquired the complete Archive of EMI Music Canada and its partner labels, a donation from Universal Music Canada. This archive covers the complete history of EMI, 1949-2012, and includes over two million items documenting all aspects of music production and business operations. Audiovisual media include 40,000 recordings in 47 different formats. Of the 18,000 audio recordings, 13,000 are original studio masters. Included are numerous Canadian artists, but through its partnership with Capitol Records, many of the most prominent bands of the time are included; the Beatles and Pink Floyd were first distributed in North America by EMI. With the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the University of Calgary has initiated a project to migrate and preserve audio and video recordings in the archive and to develop a model contributing to the capacity of libraries, archives, and museums worldwide to confront this grand challenge. The speakers will address organizational and technological findings from a planning stage as this endeavor moves into full production.


http://www.ucalgary.ca/utoday/issue/2017-10-05/15m-grant-andrew-w-mellon-foundation-supports-urgently-needed-research-media

Speakers
TH

Tom Hickerson

Vice Provost and University Librarian, University of Calgary
avatar for Annie Murray

Annie Murray

Associate University Librarian for Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary
Annie Murray is Associate University Librarian for Archives and Special Collections at the University of Calgary, where she oversees The Canadian Architectural Archives, Special Collections, and the University of Calgary Archives. She has been a longtime participant in the Spoken... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Senate

3:45pm

Improving Access and Delivery for Special Collections and Archives
Indexing of Special Collections for Increased Accessibility (Russell, Hlava)
Challenge of Discovery: Recent large-scale initiatives focused the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries on the need for significantly expanded and enhanced metadata for our digital collections, both retrospective and prospective. This requires new tools and changing roles and responsibilities for cataloging/metadata staff, including the application of automated processes, improved and consistent metadata practices, and the development of new taxonomies. Projects that are described include the new genealogical initiatives with the Internet Archive and Family Search, Portal of Florida History, the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and the Cuban Heritage Initiatives. We have concluded the pilot project on automated indexing and metadata generation for the Portal of Florida History using 25,000 full-text records and the JSTOR thesaurus instead of the Library of Congress subject headings to automatically index the collection and create a search portal. Results of the pilot show significantly increased retrievability, greater depth of accessibility via detailed subject metadata and then explores application to the entire digital collection.


ArcLight: Illuminating Discovery to Delivery for Archives and Special Collections (Matienzo)
ArcLight is a community-based effort to build an open source Blacklight-based environment to support discovery and delivery of archival material, led by Stanford University. ArcLight's community-focused design process ran from late 2014 to early 2017 and was led by Stanford with contributions from University of Michigan, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, Georgia Tech, and the National Library of Medicine. Following the design phase, Stanford built a minimum viable product in collaboration with the University of Michigan and advisory contributions from a number of other domain experts in archives, from institutions including Michigan's Bentley Historical Library, Georgia Tech, the National Library of Medicine, and the Rockefeller Archive Center. Our project is intended to focus on improving the experience from discovery to delivery for archival material, primarily, but not exclusively digital, and addressing long-standing needs in front-end system integration for archives and special collections.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_C._Russell
http://www.accessinn.com/team-view/margie-hlava/
http://www.textrelease.com/gl19program.html
https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/samvera/ArcLight
https://arclight-demo.projectblacklight.org/

Speakers
avatar for Marjorie M. K. Hlava

Marjorie M. K. Hlava

President, Access Innovations, Inc.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organ... Read More →
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Collaboration and Interoperability Architect, Library, Stanford University
Mark A. Matienzo is Collaboration & Interoperability Architect at Stanford University Libraries. Mark's role serves as a cross-pollinator of technical and domain knowledge for libraries, archives and museums (LAMs) as a technologist and facilitator.
avatar for Judith C. Russell

Judith C. Russell

Dean of University Libraries, University of Florida


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Embassy

3:45pm

Research Outputs: You Want Me to Do What?!? Finding a Way Forward for Librarians, Researchers and Other Stakeholders
Research universities and their academic libraries are racing to develop methodologies and solutions for handling research outputs, particularly datasets, visualizations and publication data, in compliance with the growing number of policies and mandates while increasing the impact of the outputs. Researchers are likewise under pressure to do their work faster and more efficiently. They are doing this while also looking for ways to maximize the impact of their research in order to better position themselves to achieve the next big grant, research breakthrough and advance their career. What can we do to move forward collectively and for the greater good? This session will examine the challenges involved by featuring three panelists, two librarians from two different research institutions and a systems developer, presenting the perspectives of the librarian, researcher, and other stakeholders, all in a lively dialogue format. Then, with the challenges identified and listed, the session will look at a possible solution via a new library-led initiative being launched that will bring together a number of universities and Ex Libris in order to develop a new approach to increase visibility, impact and compliance of research outputs and data while serving the multiple stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Oren Beit-Arie

Oren Beit-Arie

Chief Strategy Officer, Ex Libris
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services & Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in l... Read More →
PS

Paul Soderdahl

Associate University Librarians for Information Technology, University of Iowa


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Executive Room

3:45pm

Research Sprints as Engagement Tool for Librarians & Faculty
Research Sprints is a program that engages faculty with a team of librarians in an intensive week exclusively dedicated to a single project. University of Kansas Libraries and University of Minnesota Libraries have each held their own week of Research Sprints. The ultimate goal is to foster positive relationships between libraries and academic departments, perform targeted outreach that highlights the skillsets of librarians, and advance research and pedagogical endeavors within universities. Sprints projects engage faculty from a wide variety of disciplines and advance scholarship in partnership with library experts in areas such as data management, digital mapping, metadata, course design, open education, and database design. The project briefing will present the tactical approach of each library to display the range of methods of connecting faculty with librarians within the general structure. Presenters will discuss issues such as promotion, project selection, team formation, planning and team dynamics. Each library has assessed its program and will share lessons learned and planned revisions for future Sprints.


lib.ku.edu/research-sprints
http://dash.umn.edu/portfolio/greek-rhetoric-in-situ/
https://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/190187

Speakers
avatar for Shanda Hunt

Shanda Hunt

Public Health Librarian & Data Curation Specialist, University of Minnesota
avatar for Michael Peper

Michael Peper

Head of Center for Faculty Initiatives and Engagement, University of Kansas
BW

Ben Wiggins

Program Director for the Digital Arts Sciences & Humanities, University of Minnesota
KY

Karna Younger

Faculty Engagement Librarian, University of Kansas


Monday December 11, 2017 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Calvert

4:45pm

Break
Monday December 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Blue Pre-function

5:00pm

Beyond the Repository: Exploring Integration Between Local and Distributed Digital Preservation Systems
Many institutions have established digital repository systems in order to preserve the valuable scholarship and cultural heritage that is either generated or collected by their constituencies. In addition, many of these same organizations have distributed copies of these materials to various locations in order to mitigate the risks associated with lack of geographic diversity, lack of technological diversity, and loss of data related to human activities and systems failures. Services like APTrust, LOCKSS, DPN, and Chronopolis have developed to provide this geographical diversity. As these services have matured, the problem of tracking data from a local repository to a distributed preservation service has not been resolved. Northwestern University and the University of California, San Diego were awarded an Institute of Museum and Library Services Planning Grant (LG-72-16-0135-16) to explore the integration between local repositories and distributed digital preservation systems. This grant seeks to answer questions like, "How does one curate objects to ingest into a long-term dark preservation system?" as well as questions regarding managing multiple copies and versions of digital objects in multiple systems and the implications of varying storage structures on data restoration. To uncover answers, the grant team distributed a survey and also conducted a series of in-depth interviews with cultural heritage institutions. This talk will describe the findings from both, highlighting results regarding criteria used in curation decisions, versioning practices, common workflows and workarounds, and the use (or not) of preservation policies.


https://www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/lg-72-16-0135-16

Speakers
SS

Sibyl Schaefer

Digital Preservation Analyst for Research Data Curation; Chronopolis Program Manager, University of California, San Diego
Sibyl Schaefer is the Chronopolis Program Manager and Digital Preservation Analyst for the University of California, San Diego. She has spent much of her career working with archival systems for arrangement, description, and preservation. She has been recognized as an Emerging Le... Read More →
avatar for Evviva Weinraub

Evviva Weinraub

Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies, Northwestern University
Fedora, Samvera, Avalon, and Digital Preservation.


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Executive Room

5:00pm

Collaboration and Platform Integration in Support of a Federated Research Data Management Service in Canada
The stewardship of research data requires support for researchers at all stages of the research lifecycle to ensure that valuable data is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR). While several excellent institutional, domain-specific, and more general repositories currently exist both within Canada and abroad, the question of where to deposit data for discovery, reuse, and preservation remains pervasive. Portage was established by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) in 2015 to support the shared stewardship of research data through a Network of Expertise that assists libraries with providing research data management (RDM) services on their campuses and through partnerships with infrastructure providers to make RDM platforms widely available. This session will provide an overview of the progress made since Portage and the Canadian RDM landscape was first presented to CNI in 2015, highlighting three platforms that will support researchers and institutions through a model of shared data services: the DMP Assistant, a national, bilingual, data management planning platform and associated metadata templates; the joint Portage-Compute Canada Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR); and Dataverse North, a national effort to coordinate services and offerings of Dataverse-based repositories operating in several Canadian academic institutions. The session will provide comparisons of system architecture, metadata schema, user interfaces, workflow, and search capabilities between the two repository systems, enabling a broader view of key areas for future integration and feature extension through existing open source RDM tools for researcher collaboration, data manipulation and visualization, and preservation. We will also present our vision for seamless, equitable access to RDM platforms and services for Canadian institutions and researchers through a distributed service model that supports institutions both locally and nationally.

Speakers
avatar for Corey Davis

Corey Davis

Digital Preservation Network Coordinator, University of Victoria
avatar for DonnaBourneTyson

DonnaBourneTyson

University Librarian, Dalhousie University
LW

Lee Wilson

Portage Service Manager, Canadian Association of Research Libraries


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Congressional B

5:00pm

Design for Diversity: Towards Inclusive Information Systems for Cultural Heritage
This session will present "Design for Diversity," a project supported by an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Forums grant that focuses on the ways in which information systems embody and reinforce cultural norms, and asks how we can design systems that account for diverse cultural materials and ways of knowing. We focus on information systems in cultural heritage organizations: libraries, archives, and museums. Our core assumption is that technological systems are never neutral, and our project centers on areas like metadata, user interfaces, technological standards, algorithms, programming languages, and operating systems. Based on a series of working meetings and open forums, we will be developing a collaborative pedagogical toolkit to encourage inclusive and ethical practices in information sciences and system design in the cultural heritage sector. This briefing will first present the foundational ideas behind the project, building on strands of thought from multiple disciplines such as digital humanities, library and archival science, computer science, and museum studies. Next, this report will share the preliminary results of the project's initial environmental scan and finally, the initial outcomes of our first working meeting, held in October 2017.

Speakers
AR

Amanda Rust

Assistant Director, Digital Scholarship Group, Libraries, Northeastern University


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Blue Room

5:00pm

Leveraging Data to Monitor Makerspace Demographics: Addressing the Complexity of System Interoperability
The Foundry, a makerspace at the University of Texas Libraries, opened in September 2016. The space provides access to a large visualization wall, 3D printers, virtual reality, mills, sewing machines, 3D scanners, and a laser cutter. The Foundry is currently focused on fostering interdisciplinary, curriculum-integrated use of the equipment. It also prioritizes attracting a diverse patron constituency that represents the demographics of the campus at large. This presentation will address the role of the library in monitoring demographic use of makerspaces through strategic, mission-driven assessment practices. Topics will include, barriers to makerspace access, The Foundry assessment plan and associated data gathering practices, and current usage trends. IT system and organizational challenges associated with assessment practices will also be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Amber Welch

Amber Welch

Head of Technology Enhanced Learning, Libraries, University of Texas
Amber Welch is the Head of Technology Enhanced Learning at the University of Texas Libraries. In this role she oversees The Foundry, a 4000 sq foot makerspace located in the Fine Arts Library, as well as the Media Lab, a 44 seat Mac lab located in PCL. She is also responsible for... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Congressional A

5:00pm

Open Access Button: Putting OA into Interlibrary Loan
The Open Access Button is a family of tools to get access to articles behind paywalls, either by finding free, legal alternatives or requesting an author make a copy available. The Open Access Button has been working to integrate our services and others with library catalogs and interlibrary loan systems - to surface accessible copies of articles directly through library discovery systems and fulfill interlibrary loan requests instantly when accessible copies are available in repositories. Our goal is to save staff time, reduce costs, and increase the percentage of articles available through repositories, all while improving user experience. We're delighted to have new tools that help do all this, including DeliverOA, EmbedOA and OAsheet. In this session, we will walk through these new tools, preview what's coming next, and share some insights into what we're learning along the way.


openaccessbutton.org
openaccessbutton.org/libraries
openaccessbutton.org/embedoa
openaccessbutton.org/deliveroa
openaccessbutton.org/oasheet

Speakers
avatar for Joe McArthur

Joe McArthur

Assistant Director, Right to Research Coalition
Joseph McArthur is the Assistant Director of the Right to Research Coalition, SPARC’s student initiative. He's also the Director of the Open Access Button and supports preparations for Open Access Week and OpenCon. | | Come and chat with him about just about anything, but espe... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Senate

5:00pm

The IMLS National Digital Platform: Principles, Librarianship, and Digital Infrastructures
The National Digital Platform (NDP) is an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) framework that broadly represents the combination of software applications, social and technical infrastructures, and staff expertise that provide digital content, collections, and services to all library and archives users. More specifically, NDP is an IMLS funding project category that has been in place for three years. This year, IMLS staff have analyzed the NDP framework and awards. Two core NDP axioms emerged from these analyses: 1) all libraries can collaborate on shared tools, services, and digital approaches to meeting user needs; and 2) collaborations and shared infrastructures will only be valuable to the extent they are anchored in library and archival principles. This presentation will further explain the importance of digital library infrastructures to manifest the core principles of libraries and archives as embodied in the American Library Association Core Values of Librarianship. Additionally, the presentation will be an early opportunity to recap the October 2017 NDP report and convening with the broader digital library community. The NDP team at IMLS includes Ashley E. Sands, Emily Reynolds, James Neal, and Stephen Mayeaux.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley E. Sands

Ashley E. Sands

Senior Library Program Officer, Institute of Museum and Library Services


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Governor’s

5:00pm

The Social Welfare History Image Portal: Reinventing the Vertical File
The Social Welfare History Image Portal, based at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), is an ongoing collaborative venture displaying a range of materials from an eclectic coalition of eight partner institutions to date: VCU Libraries, University of Mary Washington Libraries, Simmons College Library, University of Minnesota Libraries, The Valentine (Museum), Union Presbyterian Seminary Library, Beth Ahabah Museum & Archives, and Baylor University Libraries. The Image Portal is a freely available online discovery environment that organizes and promotes the use of intriguing historical materials related to social reform movements. In addition to single items, Discovery Sets-curated groups focused on a particular topic-are entryways to research with primary sources. This Image Portal, constructed in Omeka, sits at the intersection of innovative teaching and learning and infrastructure to support research. In many respects, the Image Portal resembles a networked version of the "vertical file," a time-proven resource for both students and scholars at the beginning of their research journeys. This metaphor signals that the Image Portal is neither a repository nor an online exhibit with an interpretive layer. Instead, the site displays brief publications, excerpts from larger works, and interesting objects in sufficient resolution to be clearly legible and immediately useful. These individual items of interest also suggest areas of further research, as all item records are tagged and clearly identify and link to the contributing institution. This project briefing will discuss recruiting partner institutions, the use of innovative descriptive practices alongside finding aids and other cataloging information at home institutions, and the architecture of the platform.


http://images.socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/
http://images.socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/about  

Speakers
AC

Alice Campbell

Digital Outreach and Special Projects Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
CA

Catherine A. Paul

Research Assistant, Virginia Commonwealth University


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Embassy

5:00pm

Web Archiving Systems APIs (WASAPI) for Systems Interoperability and Collaborative Technical Development
Web archiving is an area of growing programmatic focus but poses high barriers to entry, particularly as a locally-provisioned activity. Observations of other opportunities in web archiving include that local and distributed preservation of web archive data remain flat; researcher use of web archive data has been impeded by lack of standardized interfaces and data exchange approaches; and distributed investments in web archiving infrastructure have been under-leveraged for lack of modularization in enabling services. The Web Archiving Systems API (WASAPI) initiative is concluding an IMLS-funded effort based on the idea that a web archiving technical ecosystem enabled by community-validated, and cooperatively-developed APIs could help address these challenges. This briefing will detail the findings and outcomes of the two-year project including technical developments, community activities, data-driven researcher support, second-tier services, and blueprints for future API development and interoperability strategies.
https://github.com/WASAPI-Community/data-transfer-apis

Speakers
JB

Jefferson Bailey

Director, Web Archiving, Internet Archive
Jefferson Bailey is Director, Web Archiving at Internet Archive. Jefferson joined Internet Archive in Summer 2014 and manages Internet Archive's web archiving services including Archive-It, used by over 450 institutions to preserve the web. He also oversees contract domain-scale... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Taylor

Nicholas Taylor

Program Manager, LOCKSS and Web Archiving, Stanford University
Nicholas Taylor is Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving at Stanford University Libraries. In this role, he manages the provision of distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks, including the Global LOCKSS... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Calvert

5:30pm

Break
Monday December 11, 2017 5:30pm - 5:45pm
Blue Pre-function

5:45pm

A Strategic Framework for Institutional Research Data Curation
A challenge of developing and maintaining a data curation service is in making choices about where to invest limited resources and understanding likely uses for the data. An EDUCAUSE working group brought together libraries, IT, and archives experts to create a strategic framework for institutional research data curation. This framework offers a definition for research data curation and an associated taxonomy of components. Noting the range and scope of these components, the working group realized that comprehensive research data curation requires collaboration across the entire institution. The working group framework includes a tool that will allow institutions of varying sizes, characteristics and capacity to identify the roles and/or units within the institutions currently providing research data curation support and to highlight existing gaps or resource needs for additional support or services. By providing a comprehensive overview of the services, skills, and roles needed to support institutional research data curation, the framework allows libraries, IT and archives to make the case for resources to implement and support research data curation.
https://www.educause.edu/ecar/ecar-working-groups
http://dataconservancy.org/

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
AL

Anne Linton

Director, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Executive Room

5:45pm

Advances in the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) Community
The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) community is comprised of a growing number of the world's leading university, state, and national libraries, museums, galleries, archives, software firms, research institutions, and cultural heritage organizations working with digital images on the web. Now at version 2.1.1, the IIIF specifications have become the shared standard for digital image repositories. In the past year, the IIIF community has embarked on multiple projects and collaborations to advance the usefulness and adoption of IIIF across the GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) landscape and beyond. With two dedicated staff (a community manager and a technical coordinator) now working on behalf of the IIIF Consortium, and a growing community of active contributors, the initiative is poised to move forward through the following projects:


- Expanding the IIIF Presentation API to include time-based audio/visual materials (draft specifications are currently being tested by the Avalon Media System team and the British Library)
- Consulting partnership with the American Art Collaborative, and future consulting engagements
- Multi-institutional collaboration to improve OpenJPEG, an open-source JPEG2000 codec
- Partnership with DHSI (Digital Humanities Summer Institute)
- Increased collaboration with Japanese cultural heritage institutions, recent IIIF events in Japan
- Increased locally-organized events (Harvard meet-up in September, London event at the V&A in November)
- Exploration of STEM use cases, and potential for 3D and IIIF


In addition, in the past year, the IIIF specifications have been adopted by a number of institutions (the Smithsonian Institution, Folger Shakespeare Library, and National Gallery of Art are the latest institutions to join the IIIF Consortium) and software packages such as CONTENTdm, and ExLibris' Rosetta and Alma. This project briefing will cover the latest experiments, applications, and highlights of adoption over the past year, updates on the specific projects listed above, and an overview of how interested parties can get involved with the growing IIIF community. This session will be of interest to parties from all institutions responsible for digital image repositories.


http://iiif.io/
http://iiif.io/community/consortium/
http://iiif.io/news/2017/08/30/newsletter/

Speakers
avatar for Karen Estlund

Karen Estlund

Associate Dean for Technology and Digital Strategies, Pennsylvania State University


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Senate

5:45pm

Creating a New Way to Search
Earlier this year, JSTOR Labs, an experimental product development group at JSTOR, released Text Analyzer, a new way to search in which users can upload their own document to initiate a search to find similar articles on the same topics. Scholars can upload near-finished manuscripts as a way to complete a literature review, and students can enter a few pages of a work-in-progress paper to find scholarship they'll need to finish their paper. Text Analyzer uses natural language processing to figure out what the uploaded document is "about" and then recommends articles and chapters in JSTOR about the same topics. Since its release, the JSTOR Labs team has worked with Columbia University Libraries to encourage the tool's usage and to explore possible applications of the tool. In this session, we will demonstrate the tool and the technology that powers it, share reactions of students and scholars who have used it, and reflect upon the challenges in driving adoption of a new kind of search, when users are accustomed to a single manner of interaction. We will also propose applications for this technology beyond the JSTOR corpus. These possibilities include the augment of other, current library systems, such as using a common infrastructure to create a discovery layer and aggregation of institutional repositories.
www.jstor.org/analyze
http://labs.jstor.org

Speakers
avatar for Alex Humphreys

Alex Humphreys

Director, JSTOR Labs, JSTOR
Alex Humphreys (twitter: @abhumphreys) is Director, JSTOR Labs at ITHAKA. The JSTOR Labs team works with partner publishers, libraries and scholars to create experimental tools for research and teaching. Alex has twenty years of experience creating digital tools, products and bus... Read More →
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning, Columbia University


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Embassy

5:45pm

Creating Topical Collections: Web Archives vs. the Live Web
Creating collections of web pages related to significant events such as natural disasters or terror attacks has gained importance over the last few years. Not only academic digital library and special collection departments but also historians and social scientists apply various techniques to collect resources of interest. A common approach is to deploy a focused web crawler that targets web pages highly relevant to the event. However, with the dynamic and fast-paced nature of the web, the timing of these crawls becomes a critical issue. In other words, if too much time has elapsed since the event, the live web may not be the best source for such crawls anymore. We are hypothesizing that creating a web collection about an unplanned event (e.g., a terror attack) some time after the event happened is better done as a focused crawl of web archives than on the live web. With today's landscape of web archiving institutions and protocols to access their holdings simultaneously i.e., Memento, we are able to create highly relevant web collections of events from the past. In this talk I will present preliminary results of our collaborative study (together with Herbert Van de Sompel and Lyudmilla Balakireva) into focused crawls of web archives vs. the live web. I will detail our methodology, show the precision of web archive crawls, showcase the benefits of utilizing multiple web archives at once, and contrast our findings with cost factors such as crawl time. Our results aim to support anyone interested in creating high-quality topical web collections or refining existing broad archival collections and make a strong argument for the merit of (utilizing) multiple web archives.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Governor’s

5:45pm

Data Capsule Appliance for Research Analysis of Restricted and Sensitive Data in Academic Libraries
This Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant funded project ($320,546 2017-2019) is a partnership with eight academic libraries (Indiana University, Lafayette College, MIT, Rutgers University, Swarthmore College, University of California-Berkeley, University of California-Los Angeles, and the University of Virginia) to understand current library needs and practices in provisioning library services for computational access to special collections having constraints due to sensitivity or policy restrictions. It also will extend the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) Data Capsule service to broader needs of provisioning for analytical access to restricted collections across a range of library collections and study extensions of the HTRC Data Capsule to cloud computing environments for broader uses. Currently in its beginning phases, this panel will showcase key use cases for the HTRC Data Capsule at partner libraries and will seek input from others looking for similar technical solutions for born-digital content. The project estimates that it will have a national impact through the provision of a portable solution for accessing restricted and sensitive collections and by fostering a community and increased collaboration around the technical, organizational, and policy challenges of providing computational access to restricted collections, all under the rubric of connecting libraries to the HathiTrust Consortium and its hundreds of member libraries.
https://analytics.hathitrust.org
https://github.com/htrc/HTRC-DataCapsules
https://pti.iu.edu/centers/d2i/index.html
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu
https://www.library.virginia.edu
https://libraries.mit.edu

Speakers
avatar for Inna Kouper

Inna Kouper

Indiana University Bloomington
avatar for Robert McDonald

Robert McDonald

Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Indiana University Bloomington
As the Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Robert H. McDonald works to provide library information system services and discovery services to the entire IU system and manages projects related to scholarly communications, new model publishing, and technologies th... Read More →
EM

Erik Mitchell

Associate University Librarian, Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services, UC Berkeley
I'm a librarian, administrator and researcher who cares about how libraries impact our daily lives. I have a passion for structured data and can be easily drawn into a conversation about why we focus so much library energy on metadata and information systems.
avatar for John Unsworth

John Unsworth

Dean of Libraries and University Librarian, University of Virginia
Hiring Associate University Librarian for Public Services now, and several other senior leadership positions in the coming year.


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Congressional B

5:45pm

Innovations with Solr at Penn: Novel Methods of Incorporating Multiple Record Sets and Cross-Referencing Headings
The University of Pennsylvania Libraries has recently released a new version of our Franklin discovery interface on Blacklight that includes improved handling of multiple record sets in Solr; in this case, we are combining our local collection records with the records of the HathiTrust (for a total of 8.5 million records). In the earlier version of Franklin, we deduplicated the records and overlaid them, but this approach had several downsides in terms of extensibility and user control over faceting their results. In the new version, we use grouping in Solr to cluster the record sets, which leverages dynamically prioritized institutional metadata and allows users to refine the results in the ways we've learned they want. Significantly, it would also allow us to combine as many further record sets as we could obtain in the future. The user interface combines the records, in effect deduplicating them at query time rather than at index time. In addition, we have developed a Solr indexing technique that generates authority mappings (backed by a linked data triplestore and written directly to the index), cross-referencing material under multiple potential subject or name headings without having to alter the records themselves. These approaches could be applied at other institutions using Blacklight or Solr discovery.
https://franklin.library.upenn.edu

Speakers
MG

Michael Gibney

Senior Developer, Libraries, University of Pennsylvania
EM

Emily Morton-Owens

Assistant University Librarian, Digital Library Development & Systems, University of Pennsylvania
JS

Jon Shaw

Associate University Librarian, User Services & Resource Management, University of Pennsylvania


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Calvert

5:45pm

Library Analytics Case Study: Informing and Transforming Library Instruction Programs
As the use and application of analytics mature, so do opportunities for libraries to better understand how data can inform decision-making practices, identify literacy needs, and increase user interactions with library services. At the University of Michigan Library, we are engaged in a variety of assessment activities, from surveys to rubrics to focus groups. Library analytics offer us another method to further engage in assessing our impact on learning and strengthening opportunities to share our expertise with the campus. Given data complexities (access, storage, analysis), policy implications (privacy, IRB), and the emergent nature of analytics, we launched a specific experiment to test the question of how library analytics could transform our instruction program. We scoped an experiment around existing data from the library instruction request system and the University data warehouse. What we learned has direct implications for our program planning (demographics, sequencing, curriculum development), resource allocation, and delivery of library instruction. This session will provide an overview of our experiment, dive into the challenges we faced, outline our methodology, highlight preliminary results, and invite attendees to envision experiments for their own campus.

Speakers
LA

Laurie Alexander

Associate University Librarian for Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan
Position at Company ABC.
DB

Doreen Bradley

Director, Learning Programs and Initiatives, University of Michigan


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Blue Room

5:45pm

Seven Years of Libra at UVA: From Single IR to Modular Scholarly Repository Services
What happens when the chosen solution to an institution's service needs, whether homegrown, community developed, or purchased, reaches end-of-life or dies on the vine, but the academic and organizational reasons for the service continue to expand?
In 2010, the University of Virginia was an early adopter of Hydra/Fedora repository solutions. By 2014, it was time for more than just a code refresh. In 2017, we now have multiple modular repository parts, some more open source than others. This is not your grandparents' repository. We have had successes (student deposits as graduation requirements, one-stop searching, consistent branding), some failures typical of early institutional repositories (if you build it, they might not come), and some promising experiments (modular containers for different content types, persistent identifiers for both works and authors). In 2016 we relaunched our then-Hydra/Sufia "LibraETD" repository and rolled out LibraData (built on Dataverse) as our modular data container. In 2017 we launched the Samvera/Sufia "LibraOpen" to better address the emerging open scholarship needs of University authors. As we continue to assess existing modular services and add new ones such as library publishing and software preservation, we would like to share our experiences and metrics, learn about how other experts are managing and enhancing what they offer, and keep investing in community solutions relevant to the needs of institutions like ours.


http://libra.virginia.edu

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Ramsey

Ellen Ramsey

Director, Scholarly Repository Services, University of Virginia
Ellen is Director, Scholarly Repository Services at the University of Virginia Library. She works to make scholarly content generated by the UVA community openly accessible whenever possible. Her duties encompass oversight of UVA's current Fedora-based repository (Libra) and plan... Read More →


Monday December 11, 2017 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Congressional A

6:15pm

Reception
Monday December 11, 2017 6:15pm - 7:30pm
Empire Ballroom
 
Tuesday, December 12
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday December 12, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Empire Ballroom

9:00am

Developing a Digital Scholarship Center on the Foundation of Creativity
In this presentation, we will share our experiences developing the Digital Scholarship Center (DSC) at Rowan University. We will discuss guiding principles, the focus on creativity and collaboration, challenges, strengths, and successes, and creative solutions for staffing and project development. We will also share our experiences in building a vibrant workshop program, partnering with faculty, departments, and a student entrepreneurial group. In addition, we will discuss the projects developed by our DSC, which includes the Glassboro Summit Collection and our Rowan Public Art project. The session will provide insight on challenges and creative solutions for developing a DSC, managing projects, collaborating, and building a workshop program.
http://libguides.rowan.edu/dsc
http://glassborosummit.com/

Speakers
MB

Michael Benson

Coordinator of the Digital Scholarship Center, Rowan University


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Embassy

9:00am

DPLA Exchange And SimplyE, an Open Platform for E-Content Services, Helping Libraries Take Back Control of E-Content Delivery to Your Patrons
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is proud to be launching a pilot to support and test a new model for library-owned and library-centered ebook delivery. The emerging architecture is connected by the standard Open Publication Distribution System (OPDS) protocol and includes three key components, (1) the new DPLA Exchange (exchange.dp.la), a library-led marketplace in which participants can select and acquire popular titles as well as free public domain works and openly licensed works, (2) the Library Simplified Circulation Manager, a middleware solution that DPLA is now hosting for libraries as a service in partnership with LYRASIS that provides library staff an administrative panel to edit metadata, blend content from the DPLA Exchange and other sources, curate their e-collection and syndicate them in an OPDS feed to (3) SimplyE, the open source iOS and Android apps built and supported by the New York Public Library that serves econtent to users in three taps or less. Together these components, which, because of their interoperability are also interchangeable in that libraries could substitute another component for any piece they choose, offer flexibility and a complete library-owned stack to acquire, curate and serve e-content from a variety of licensed and open sources through a user experience they can choose and control to maximize discovery and access.
This panel presentation and discussion will discuss how DPLA exchange and SimplyE are being deployed in the pilot, and how this platform is being considered in academic libraries for delivery of e-content.
This work was made possible by a grant from the Sloan Foundation and many members of the DPLA community.
https://dp.la/info/2017/10/10/dpla-exchange-offers-library-centered-ebook-marketplace/
http://www.librarysimplified.org/
exchange.dp.la

Speakers
RC

Robert Cartolano

Associate Vice President for Technology and Preservation, Columbia University
JE

James English

Project Director SimplyE, New York Public Library
avatar for Michele Kimpton

Michele Kimpton

Interim Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Membership, sustainability, new innovations, new services
DM

David Millman

Assistant Dean for Digital Library Technology Services, New York University


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Blue Room

9:00am

Effectively Engaging the Next Generation of Researchers & Librarians to Advance Open: Lessons Learned from OpenCon and Opportunities for the Future
Hosted by SPARC, OpenCon is a global community that empowers the next generation to advance Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data and seeks to drive culture change at scale. Since launching in 2014, OpenCon has received more than 25,000 applications to attend its main global meeting and reached more than 4,500 in-person participants-most at 70 satellite events that have been locally hosted across 32 countries. The community has helped to launch dozens of projects and collaborations, including a monthly community call for librarians working on Open on campus and this year's Open Action Kit to support Open Access Week activities. This session will explore lessons learned in how to effectively engage early career researchers on campus, opportunities for libraries to tap into the existing OpenCon network, and how OpenCon can evolve to support librarians working to advance Open on campus as effectively as possible.


http://www.opencon2017.org

Speakers
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC
Nick Shockey is the Director of Programs & Engagement for SPARC and founding Director of the Right to Research Coalition, an international alliance of student organizations that promote Open Access to the results of research through advocacy and education.As the Director of Programs & Engagement, Nick is responsible for growing SPARC’s engagement with members and the wider community, managing SPARC’s digital platforms, and developing initiatives across SPARC’s program areas. In this capacity, Nick leads the organization of International Open Access Week and directs SPARC’s student program.Nick led the launch of the Right to Research Coalition in 2009 and has grown the organization to include more than 90 member student organizations, which collectively represent nearly 7 million students in over 100 countries around the world.In 2014, Nick led the launch of OpenCon, a new conference series which brings together leading student and early career researcher advocates from dozens of countries to advance the issues of Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data. To date, OpenCon has received more than 5,000 applications from individuals in over 150 countries.Nick’s other efforts to raise awareness of Open Access within the research community and beyond include the production of... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Congressional A

9:00am

Fostering Organizational Change through Service and Space Design Strategy
In Spring 2017, the University of Michigan Library completed an engagement with brightspot strategy, consultants who worked with our academic user community and staff to design a service framework and space strategy to guide our organization's work into the future. This holistic framework and philosophy have the potential to transform our large organization's approach to designing and delivering aligned and impactful user experiences. A Service Design Task Force was formed to take this strategy and begin to design pilots and prototypes for new and evolved services and spaces, with a particular focus on enhancing the library's ability to partner around consultation, digital scholarship, and designing for emergence. The three members of the Task Force represent expertise in learning and teaching services, user experience, space design, discovery services, and web technologies. Our goal in this work is to transform our organization's capacity to design, deliver, and iterate high quality virtual and physical services in 21st-century learning and research environments within the library through user and staff engagement, rapid prototyping, and design thinking. In our presentation, the Task Force members will share current and future strategies for engaging the organization in this work, including tools and formats for design and discussion that have supported our work with the library community. We'll also discuss next steps for piloting and prototyping new service ideas in existing library spaces in order to inform future space transformations.

Jessica Sher contributed to this project.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Rodgers

Emily Rodgers

Space, Design and Assessment Librarian, University of Michigan
I'm the Space, Design and Assessment Librarian at the University of Michigan Library. I love building communities around sharing resources, skills, perspectives and tools to enable individuals to achieve their goals. I also love reading and hot summer days.
avatar for Meghan Sitar

Meghan Sitar

Director of Connected Scholarship, University of Michigan
As Director of Connected Scholarship at the University of Michigan Library, I lead a team of individuals dedicated to partnering with our community of scholars and library colleagues to enable discovery, exploration and creation. We do this through direct user interactions, consu... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Vacek

Rachel Vacek

Head of Design and Discovery, University of Michigan
Rachel Vacek manages the Design & Discovery department that provides front-end web development, design, content strategy, user research, accessibility expertise, and UX strategy across the entire University of Michigan Library web presence. Program managers on her team also coord... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Hampton

9:00am

From First Seeds to Now: Researching, Building, and Piloting a Harvesting Tool
Automatically harvesting content into the university's faculty profiles and repository is a dream of many institutions looking for solutions to save their staff valuable time. Besides streamlining library projects, harvesting can bring value to groups on campus who need to see the full range of faculty scholarship. Updated infrastructure and a new, more efficient development process means that bepress is beginning to turn the dream of automated population into a reality. The new harvesting tool collects metadata from published journal articles as well as materials like conference papers and datasets from a large array of disciplines-not just STM fields-and shows publications in relation to affiliated institutions. This project briefing will discuss bepress's research, development, and pilot phases. It will include details about the tool, and the process of selecting a source that provides access to 160 million objects from databases including PubMed, Elsevier's ScienceDirect, Springer, IEEE, ArXiv, SSRN, RePec, and JSTOR. Lessons learned from an invaluable group of pilot testers that challenged assumptions and pushed to improve workflows for a variety of campus needs will be discussed. The session will provide a framework for approaching this type of technical evaluation and development, as well as information about bepress's current and upcoming plans for harvesting.

Speakers
AC

Ann Connolly

Director of Product, bepress


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Calvert

9:00am

Linked Data for Libraries and (Metadata) Production (LD4L/LD4P)
The Mellon Foundation-funded projects Linked Data for Libraries (LD4L) Labs and Linked Data for (Metadata) Production (LD4P) began in April 2016 as joint two-year follow-ons to the initial Mellon-funded LD4L project. LD4L Labs is a partnership led by Cornell together with Harvard, Iowa, and Stanford. LD4P is a partnership led by Stanford together with Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Library of Congress, and Princeton. The overall goal of these projects is to make it easier for libraries and their users to create, use, and benefit from linked data, both linked data specifically designed for libraries and scholars, and broader sources of linked data on the web. In this briefing, we will report on the progress made by these two projects during their first 18 months. Topics include: discussion of the bibliotek-o bibliographic ontology and how and why it both extends and varies from BIBFRAME; a brief report on the metadata production pilots at the six LD4P partners; VitroLib, an ontology-driven linked data creation and editing tool; tools and services to provide lookup for linked-data authorities from multiple sources; and a report from the LD4P/LD4L Labs Community Input Meeting, held April 24-25, 2017 at Stanford University.
https://ld4l.org/

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Assistant University Librarian & Chief Technology Strategist, Stanford University
Hydra, Hydra-in-a-Box, Blacklight, Fedora, IIIF, Web Archiving, Linked Data, geospatial services, open source, community.
avatar for Dean B. Krafft

Dean B. Krafft

Chief Technology Strategist, Cornell University
I'm working on a number of projects: ILS replacement, Linked Data for Libraries, VIVO, campus IT models, web archiving, Hydra, and IIIF, among others.


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Capitol

9:00am

Public Knowledge Project (PKP): Sustaining a Community-led Publishing Platform
First launched in 2001, the Public Knowledge Project's (PKP) open source software Open Journal Systems (OJS) has grown into one of the world's most widely used platforms for the management and publication of scholarly journals. There are currently over 10,000 journals using OJS and a recent survey suggests that 98% of these journals offer open access (OA) to their content with 60% of the titles coming from the Global South. However, despite the continued growth and reliance on PKP software and the numerous improvements and development that OJS has had over the years, PKP felt compelled to undertake a comprehensive review of its activities, publishing platforms and other related services to ensure they address the evolving needs and interests of the international scholarly publishing community. Closely intertwined with this effort is the larger issue on the minds of many in the academic community today, concerning how to sustain community based and operated infrastructure to support the open scholarly commons. PKP is looking to determine how its current financial models and support can be strengthened to ensure that PKP is able to serve the larger goal of advancing open access and other aspects of scholarly publishing quality. In this session, we will share plans for the research we are now undertaking to develop a long-range strategy, and seek feedback on ways that this library-led open source initiative can continue to have the most impact possible. While the discussion will center around PKP and its current investigation, the discussion will naturally extend to how the library community wishes to sustain community based and operated infrastructure to support the open scholarly commons.


pkp.sfu.ca

Speakers
avatar for Juan Pablo Alperin

Juan Pablo Alperin

Assistant Professor, Simon Fraser University
Assistant Professor in Publishing at Simon Fraser University, Associate Director of Research Public Knowledge Project, and the Director of the Scholarly Communications Lab (ScholCommLab). I know a lot about Latin American scholarly publishing, quite a bit about altmetrics, and a... Read More →
AB

Allan Bell

Associate University Librarian, Digital Programs and Services, University of British Columbia
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

Consultant, BlueSky to BluePrint
Nancy works with publishers, librarians and other innovative project leaders to define, test and refine assumptions about new and existing products and services. She honed her skills in over 20 years of experience working at the nexus of publishing, higher education and technolog... Read More →
avatar for Brian Owen

Brian Owen

Associate Dean of Libraries, Simon Fraser University
Brian Owen is the Associate University Librarian for Technology Services and Special Collections at the SFU Library. He is also the Managing Director for the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) which is responsible for the development and support of Open Journal Systems (OJS) an open... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Governor’s

9:00am

These Beautiful Things: K-State Libraries Collaborates with Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art to Create an Online Collection Application
Beginning in 2016, Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries and the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art embarked on a collaborative project to build a replacement for the museum's commercial art-display web application. The museum provided salary support, aesthetic input, and assistance with access to (as well as structural insight into) their main database, while KSU Libraries provided the application development team and technical systems support. The resulting new application, which is rapidly approaching an alpha stage, provides a graphically pleasing, user-friendly interface sitting on top of a document database (rather than a traditional relational database) in order to deliver extraordinary flexibility in a compelling package. Featuring visually exciting modules, such as the gallery views, and the "virtual stroll," the new application epitomizes what is possible through constructive collaboration and collective innovation.

Speakers
JB

Jason Bengtson

Assistant Director Library IT Services, Kansas State University Libraries
I'm interested in technology, management, and intersections/opportunities between Information Technology and Information Science.


Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Congressional B

9:45am

Break
Tuesday December 12, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
Blue Pre-function

10:15am

A Tale of Two Collaborations: Shared Discovery Through the Eyes of TRLN and BorrowDirect
In this session, panelists representing the memberships of TRLN (Triangle Research Libraries Network) and Ivy Plus will discuss their experiences working on two different collaborative projects that each aim to provide shared discovery of collections across multiple institutions: TRLN's Discovery Project and IvyPlus's BorrowDirect Shared Index Project. The panel will discuss the benefits of collaboration and explore the challenges presented by their different contexts including:
• Formal vs. informal organizational structures
• Different levels of staffing
• An upgrade project vs. a new initiative
• Use of dedicated staff vs. consultants
• Geographic proximity vs. dispersion
Despite these differences, both projects also have many aspects in common. Both have questions about sustaining and maintaining the shared discovery platforms, and both expect local uses of the shared discovery index to take priority in decision making. Panelists will share the successes each collaboration has accomplished and lessons learned to date. Panelists will engage with each other, and the audience, to explore the issues raised in these two case studies in order to highlight some of the more complex and rewarding aspects of collaborative IT projects.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cartolano

Associate Vice President for Technology and Preservation, Columbia University
avatar for Elisabeth Long

Elisabeth Long

Associate University Librarian for IT and Digital Scholarship, University of Chicago
avatar for Tim  McGeary

Tim McGeary

Associate University Librarian for Information Technology Services, Duke University
avatar for Heidi Nance

Heidi Nance

Director of Resource Sharing Initiatives, Ivy Plus Libraries Partnership
avatar for Joe M. Williams

Joe M. Williams

Interim Associate University Librarian for Collections & Services, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Hampton

10:15am

Between Strategic Plan and Infrastructural Reality: Founding a Digital Research and Publishing Center at CMU
The Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Libraries and Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences are currently in the process of creating a center for digital research and publishing, as part of CMU's 2025 Strategic Plan. This presentation will address the infrastructural challenges that we face in operationalizing CMU's strategic goals to advance digital humanities, digital scholarship, scholarly communications, and research data management. While acquiring access to space, dedicated technology, and funding are familiar challenges in a university research environment, they are made more complicated in this instance by the low visibility of libraries and the humanities in tech-rich universities. The disjunction between the ambitions of CMU's Strategic Plan and the reality of our available infrastructural resources creates a liminal space in which we have been working (mostly successfully) to achieve our center's goals as part of the evolution of the University Libraries.
http://dsharp.cmu.edu
https://www.cmu.edu/strategic-plan/

Speakers
avatar for Rikk Mulligan

Rikk Mulligan

Digital Scholarship Strategist, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Jessica Otis

Jessica Otis

Digital Humanities Specialist, Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh DH, Digital Humanities, Pedagogy, CLIR-DLF Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Lisa Zilinski

Lisa Zilinski

Research Data Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
Lisa Zilinski is the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries Research Data Consultant. As faculty in the Research Curation Division, Lisa consults with all members of the CMU research community on issues surrounding data management, including developing and implementing data managem... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Blue Room

10:15am

CANCELED: Strength in Numbers: Collaborative Approaches to Measuring E-resource Usage Data
Academic libraries need accurate and reliable e-resource usage data to demonstrate return on investment, support policy and planning processes, to benchmark against comparable organizations and to support advocacy. Gathering, managing, measuring and analyzing usage data to support each of these processes is imperative. However, such activities can be time-consuming, involve significant duplication of effort, or result in poor or inconsistent data, impacting comparison and benchmarking opportunities. Rather than tackling these challenges in isolation, collaboration can offer a force for change. Jisc has partnered with organizations in the UK, USA and Australia and New Zealand to address the challenges of consistently measuring and monitoring usage and impact. Jisc provides access to library analytics tools to support communities in accessing, analyzing, evaluating and reporting on e-resource data. Working with these existing tools, while fostering new relationships and collaborations has enabled teams to work both nationally and internationally to address global issues. This session will describe several projects currently underway. This includes the IRUS-USA pilot project, a joint effort between Jisc and the Digital Library Federation (DLF), which enables institutional repositories to share and compare usage data based on the COUNTER standard. The session will also include JUSP-ANZ, a collaboration with CAVAL which enables libraries and consortia to access their e-resource usage data quickly and easily via a single point of access. The presentation will highlight the outcome of these projects to date and discuss the opportunities for international coordination and cooperation.
http://www.irus.mimas.ac.uk
http://jusp.jisc.ac.uk
https://jusp.jisc.ac.uk/irus-usa/

Speakers
JL

Jo Lambert

Service Manager, Jisc
Jo Lambert manages a number of services and projects at Jisc, a UK registered charity that champions the use of digital technologies in education and research. | Current work includes managing UK shared analytics services such as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) and... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Governor’s

10:15am

Collaboration Between Libraries and Academic Units in Advancing Multidisciplinary Scholarship by Enhancing Library Knowledge Systems
As universities emphasize the importance of cross-disciplinary research, traditional library discovery and knowledge management systems struggle to expose the connections across disciplines adequately. Because the nature of subject heading creation is to summarize concepts into precise, standardized words, traditional bibliographic classification schemas are unable to comprehensively capture all of the concepts and meanings that can be derived from texts. Combined with the practice of using different standardized vocabularies (disciplinary jargons), subject headings lack adequate semantic linking across different scholarly domains which makes discovery and use of library collections challenging for scholars trying to perform cross-disciplinary research. The University of Notre Dame, Hesburgh Libraries in partnership with the Notre Dame Center for Civil and Human Rights (CCHR), have created a research tool called Convocate to demonstrate the possibilities of cross-disciplinary discovery. Convocate brings together the fields of international human rights law and Catholic social teaching into a single discovery interface. With the aide of topic modeling, Convocate can return over 11,000 paragraphs tagged against a list of 250 topics and help users bridge the gap between the use of different terms that are related to the same concept and thus discover more robust search results. The presentation will provide a detailed narrative about the quest of minting cross-disciplinary studies, their challenges, learnings, experiences, as well as librarians' and scholars' respective roles in multidisciplinary research. The session will also demonstrate new features of Convocate. Finally, a plan will extend the work on Convocate to create a more general application that will allow scholars in other disciplines to apply various neuro-linguistic programming and machine learning methods to their texts, elucidating new insights, and training the engine to create more meaningful connections across disciplines more precisely over time. Convocate starts to present an opportunity to transform library paper-based knowledge systems to one that is scalable and sustainable in the current digital environment and to revitalize the perception of libraries as collaborators in scholarly research.


https://convocate.nd.edu/

Speakers
CL

Christina Leblang

Project Manager, University of Notre Dame
avatar for Zheng (John) Wang

Zheng (John) Wang

Associate University Librarian, University of Notre Dame
Zheng (John) Wang is Associate University Librarian for Digital Access, Resources, and Information Technology at the University of Notre Dame. He provides leadership and guidance and manages vision and strategies in the development and optimization of library systems and applicat... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Congressional B

10:15am

Open Encyclopedia System: Open Source Platform for Open Access Encyclopedias
The main objective of the Open Encyclopedia System project, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), is to develop a standardized, open source online platform for building and maintaining online encyclopedias in the humanities and social sciences that provide readers worldwide free and unrestricted online access to open access scientific content. The project consortium is made up of four partners: the Center for Digital Systems (CeDiS), the Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut - Department of Modern History (FMI), the Center for Modern Greece (CeMoG), and the Bavarian State Library (BSB) in Munich. Based on the experience gained in building an online encyclopedia on the First World War "1914-1918-Online," we are developing a digital framework that hosts a collection of customizable workflow management and editing tools to create, publish and maintain academic reference works for digital encyclopedias. The project Open Encyclopedia System (OES) started in 2016 and, by the end of the project in 2019, it will offer a generic modular open source software system with which editors and users will be able to build an online encyclopedia on their own. Our aim is to create a system for users in which collaboration is easy and web-based. The OES software should be customizable, flexible and adaptable to context applications as well as simple to operate. Ultimately, the OES software should set a standard for saving time and for being a sustainable framework for this type of publication.


www.open-encyclopedia-system.org
encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.org

Speakers
NA

Nicolas Apostolopoulos

Professor, Freie Universität Berlin, Center for Digital Systems
CS

Christoph Schimmel

Project Manager, Freie Universität Berlin, Center for Digital Systems
Currently, I'm working as a project coordinator at the Center for Digital Systems (Freie Universität Berlin) and we are about to develop open source software for open access encyclopedias, mainly in the humanities and the social sciences. Originally, I studied geography with exp... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Calvert

10:15am

Preparing for the Future: National Library of Medicine's Project to Add MeSH® RDF URIs to its Bibliographic and Authority Records
Although it is not yet known for certain what will replace MARC, eventually bibliographic data will need to be transformed to move into a linked data environment. Following on the work of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging Task Group on URIs in MARC, this project briefing will discuss why the National Library of Medicine chose to add Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) for Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as our starting point and details the process by which the URIs were added to the MeSH MARC authority records, the legacy bibliographic records, and are continually added to the records for newly cataloged items. The briefing will cover the various enhancement methods available, the decisions made, the lessons learned, and the results of our efforts.
https://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/

Speakers
DB

Diane Boehr

Head, Cataloging & Metadata Management Section, National Library of Medicine
BB

Barbara Bushman

Assistant Head, Cataloging & Metadata Management Section, National Library of Medicine
This is a brief bio.


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Embassy

10:15am

Tying the University Library to High Impact Research
On May 15, 2017, classes were over and commencement was finished but 125 American University faculty returned to campus for the Library's first annual Conference on High Impact Research. The conference seeks to connect researchers, funders, and library and industry experts to discuss new developments in research and the significant and changing role of the scholar as policy influencer and public intellectual. The Library, which provides expertise in the creation of new knowledge, in the evaluation of resources, and in digital tools and services for research, is well suited to plan and host this conference which sits at the crossroads of new technologies, dissemination of knowledge, and the larger community of scholars. The sole plenary session addressed the significance to the scholar and the institution when research influences public policy and/or the scholar becomes a public intellectual. Helping the faculty fulfill a funding agency's requirement to connect their research to the citizen public was a theme throughout. Topics included: Reverse Engineering an Abstract; Understanding Open Access and Author's Rights; Maximizing Exposure through Your Online Research Identity; Measuring Scholarly and Public Impact; Managing Interactions with the Press; Influencing Policy Makers. This project briefing will share conference insights and information on the 2nd annual event scheduled for May 2018.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Davenport

Nancy Davenport

University Librarian, American University
Nancy Davenport is the University Librarian at American University. Immediately prior she was working in Vietnam on an AID funded project to create a parliamentary library for their legislature. She has held senior positions at the Library of Congress as the Director of Acquisit... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Simpson

Katherine Simpson

Director of Strategy and Communications, University Library, American University
As Director of Strategy and Communication for the American University Library, Katherine coordinates strategic planning, assessment, and marketing. She oversees the Library's internal and external communications, events, and marketing staff and is an active member of the Library's Research Commons and Space Planning project teams. Katherine previously served as the Associate Director for Organizational Development, working on planning, training, performance management, and other HR programs for the Library. She has experience in various public services roles at both academic and public libraries. She is the co-author of chapter titled... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Congressional A

10:15am

Value of Preserving and Disseminating Student Research Through Institutional Repositories
In the context of the ongoing conversation surrounding the role of institutional repositories (IRs), Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic State University initiated a study to investigate if the library's open repository focused on stewarding, preserving and disseminating materials created by the student community has a positive impact on the overall visibility and impact of faculty scholarship, independent of faculty's participation in the repository. This is done by analyzing two distinct samples of publications: 1) a group of faculty publications from six academic departments for which research impact is calculated based on Web of Science citation data; and 2) a group of student publications (senior projects), from the same six academic departments, that are deposited in an open repository (Digital Commons). The main conclusion of the statistical analysis is that student repository activity, quantified through undergraduate senior student projects deposited in an open IR and their download counts, is significantly correlated with the research impact of faculty publications, expressed as a measure of the citation counts. This preliminary finding provides the foundation for further analysis to demonstrate the value of preserving and disseminating student research through institutional repositories.


http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/

Speakers
RP

Radu Popescu

Lecturer, California Polytechnic State University
AP

Adriana Popescu

Interim Dean of Library Services, California Polytechnic State University


Tuesday December 12, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Capitol

11:00am

Break
Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Blue Pre-function

11:15am

A Digital Infrastructure for Unifying Medieval Manuscript Collections
The Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University have developed the Digital Library of Medieval Manuscripts (DLMM), which represents the next stage of digital humanities program development based on over 20 years of scholarly, library, and technology activity. From a scholarly perspective, the DLMM brings together two signature collections, the Roman de la Rose Digital Library and the Christine de Pizan Digital Scriptorium. Previously available through two separate web-based platforms, the DLMM connects the two collections without compromising the depth of exploration and functionality available through the individual websites. Through faceted browsing and searching that accounts for different data models, scholars retain the ability to use both collections comprehensively through a unified interface. The facets can be customized on a per-collection basis. In addition to these digital manuscript collections, the underlying technology platform can support additional forms of content such as early modern books. As part of this overall development effort, the Sheridan Libraries migrated content and implemented a new image server for better functionality, performance, and scalability. The DLMM represents a major shift from customized, locally developed code to leveraging community-developed code for greater efficiency. It exposes data as IIIF so it be reused easily. The development of the DLMM represents a progression of scholarly and technology programs that have been demonstrated at previous CNI meetings.

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
MP

Mark Patton

Senior Software Engineer, Johns Hopkins University


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Capitol

11:15am

Annotation and Publishing Standards Work at the W3C
Earlier this year the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published three new W3C recommendations (standards) on web annotation. The standards are designed to foster an ecosystem of interoperable annotation tools and services, making it easier to comment on, describe, or tag any web resource. Many use cases addressed by these recommendations were driven by publisher needs and requests, and 2017 also saw the merger of the W3C and the International Digital Publishing Forum (the group responsible for the EPUB3 standard) and the subsequent chartering of the W3C Publishing Working Group. This Group has begun work on a new web publications standard and will begin work in 2018 on EPUB4 and more. Collectively these efforts have spawned a new Apache incubator project (Apache Annotator) and are helping publishers of all stripes take greater advantage of the W3C's Open Web Platform while simultaneously ensuring that the Platform supports publisher needs. This presentation will provide an overview of the W3C Web Annotation Recommendations and associated Working Group notes, it will include an update on the Apache Annotator incubator work, and it will discuss progress on the Web Publications draft standard.


For additional background and context, see the 2014 CNI briefing announcing the formation of the W3C Web Annotation Working Group.
https://www.w3.org/blog/2017/02/making-it-easier-to-share-annotations-on-the-web/ https://wiki.apache.org/incubator/AnnotatorProposal
https://github.com/apache/incubator-annotator
https://www.w3.org/publishing/groups/publ-wg/
https://www.w3.org/community/openannotation/
https://www.cni.org/topics/scholarly-communication/towards-an-open-annotation-standard-2

Speakers
TC

Tim Cole

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Congressional B

11:15am

Hydra-in-a-Box Project Final Report and Call to Community Action
After 30 months of dedicated work funded by IMLS to extend and augment technologies to enable a national digital platform for cultural heritage collections, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), DuraSpace and Stanford Libraries provide a final report on all aspects of the Hydra-in-a-Box project, including a demo of the Hyku repository. The goals of the project were ambitious and the partnership has made significant progress to produce a polished turnkey, Samvera (Hydra)-based application for next-generation digital asset management that lowers the bar for users to contribute to DPLA. We have completed pilots of a hosted service to serve institutions not positioned to run the application for themselves. As the grant-funded work concludes, we look to make good on a fourth goal to connect these key infrastructural pieces with DPLA hubs, current Samvera partners, and prospective Hyku adopters-creating a vibrant, participatory community of adopters and contributors. To do this, we must engage with the community to build infrastructure and development strategies to promote more widespread adoption of Samvera technologies. The group of institutions who expressed interest or participated in the pilot ranged widely from large state archives to small non-profit operations and include: the Arizona State Library and Archives, a statewide digital content repository and DPLA hub; the New Hampshire Digital Project, a large public library; the Cleveland Public Library; the Pennsylvania Academic Library Consortium, Inc. (PALCI); the University of Miami; and St. Lawrence University. More than forty organizations expressed interest in joining the pilot project and it's generated more than seventy leads for the next phase of development. The larger Samvera community involves a range of participants, including nearly sixty partner institutions who participate in regular meetings and commit code to the project, including Hyku. Similarly, those interested in hosting Hyku range from US-based non-profits, open source software companies, and publishers, in addition to international businesses. We'll conclude the report by presenting opportunities for community members to participate and share in the next phase of the project: integrate Hyku with the larger Samvera community, contribute to the codebase, provide hosted services, and promote rapid adoption of the technology.


Hyku Pilots and Leads https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16nBE1Rlr2CBf8oKtEuS1DE2NlWlpqD3tm0xLeZHqSzw/edit#gid=1896613910
https://hykudirect.com/

Speakers
MD

Michael Della Bitta

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Assistant University Librarian & Chief Technology Strategist, Stanford University
Hydra, Hydra-in-a-Box, Blacklight, Fedora, IIIF, Web Archiving, Linked Data, geospatial services, open source, community.
avatar for Hannah Frost

Hannah Frost

Manager, Digital Library Product and Service Management, Stanford University
Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Michele Kimpton

Michele Kimpton

Interim Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Membership, sustainability, new innovations, new services
DH

Debra Hanken Kurtz

CEO, DuraSpace


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Hampton

11:15am

Serving Individual Researchers: Lessons Learned from JSTOR's Access Model
Five years ago, JSTOR launched two new individual access models: Register & Read and JPASS. We sought to provide access to an underserved population: researchers outside the academy seeking access to scholarly content. We have succeeded in serving this nebulous population. Since 2015, people have read 3.7 million articles for free through Register & Read, and JPASS has 3,500+ monthly active users accessing content on the platform and taking advantage of new tools, like MyLists and Outline builder, to advance their scholarship.
Librarians and publishers talk often about these "other users." Through these efforts, we have been able to learn more about the needs and behaviors of individual researchers and to use engagement campaigns to ensure they get the most value from their access to research. Through experimentation, we've also identified new audiences, like authors and genealogists, who can particularly benefit from JSTOR's individual model.
In this session, we'll discuss how our models have evolved alongside our institutional relationships, and lead a discussion about how JSTOR envisions responding to the needs of individual scholars in our evolving higher education landscape.


http://jpass.jstor.org
https://support.jstor.org/hc/en-us/articles/115004760028-MyJSTOR-How-to-Register-Get-Free-Access-to-Content

Speakers
RB

Rahul Belani

Vice President for Product, JSTOR


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Congressional A

11:15am

Shared Repository Infrastructure
This briefing will present findings from a recent quantitative analysis of 115 bepress and other research university repositories, along with lessons learned at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). VCU has been a bepress customer since 2014, and since that time has grown its repository to roughly 13,000 items, 1 million downloads, and complete runs of two established national association journals. This briefing will advance conversations about shared repository infrastructure requirements including capacity, support, community, and policy.

Note: this briefing has not been sponsored, encouraged, or reviewed by any commercial interests.

Speakers
avatar for Jimmy Ghaphery

Jimmy Ghaphery

Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Communications and Publishing, Virginia Commonwealth University
As Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Communications and Publishing at VCU Libraries, I am responsible for our IT, Scholarly Communications, Repository, Publishing, and Data Management operations. Over the past year we have made a new push toward building out repository... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Governor’s

11:15am

Taking the Carpentry Model to Librarians: How to Build a Library Community for Data Intelligence and Better Collaboration Across Institutions
Library Carpentry is a growing community of instructors and lesson developers whose mission is to teach librarians the tools, techniques and best practices around working with data and using software to automate repetitive tasks. Using the pedagogical practices of live coding, pair programming, discussion and exercises, Library Carpentry creates a safe and collaborative space for important concepts in computing and data, including data manipulation and organization, using the computer to repeat things and the importance of text pattern matching. We teach these concepts using the Unix shell to repeat commands over text and data, regular expressions to match and operate on text strings, and OpenRefine to clean and standardize datasets. Not only do these skills help librarians create reproducible workflows and repeated operations for data-centric tasks, they give librarians a common language with researchers that can lead to a better mutual understanding of data issues and it paves the way to greater collaboration between the library and research departments. In the last two years, Library Carpentry has held two sprints to improve the lesson materials that included over 100 people at 13 sites worldwide. The California Digital Library (CDL) has been awarded a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services that funds a two year, full-time North American Coordinator for Library Carpentry and discussions are starting about integrating with Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry. Currently, Library Carpentry instructors are trained and certified through Software Carpentry, and lessons for all of the Carpentries are created and maintained in Github, using the same templates. In the next year, Library Carpentry will map out an infrastructure of the growing community, formalize lesson development processes, expand its pool of instructors, and create more instructor trainers to meet the demand for Library Carpentry workshops around the globe.

http://librarycarpentry.github.io/
https://github.com/LibraryCarpentry
Presentation for this event: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1112373




Speakers
JC

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library
avatar for Tim Dennis

Tim Dennis

Director, Social Sciences Data Archive, University of California, Los Angeles


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Blue Room

11:15am

The Biodiversity Information Standards (TDWG): Opportunities for Collaboration and Participation
The Biodiversity Information Standards (TDWG), also known as the Taxonomic Databases Working Group, is a non-profit scientific and educational association that is affiliated with the International Union of Biological Sciences. TDWG was formed to establish international collaboration among biological database projects and related services. Promoting the wider and more effective dissemination of information about the World's heritage of biological organisms for the benefit of the world at large, TDWG focuses on the development of standards for the exchange of biological/biodiversity data. TDWG promotes the use of standards through the most appropriate and effective means and acts as a forum for discussion through holding meetings and through publications, especially the recently launched open access journal, Biodiversity Information Standards and Science. This presentation will focus on areas of possible collaboration by the larger networked information community around bioinformatic standards, areas where TDWG collaborates with other biodiversity organizations such as the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL), the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL), and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).


www.tdwg.org
https://biss.pensoft.net/

Speakers
avatar for Martin Kalfatovic

Martin Kalfatovic

Associate Director, Smithsonian Institution


Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Calvert

11:45am

Lunch
Tuesday December 12, 2017 11:45am - 1:00pm
Empire Ballroom

1:00pm

Beprexit: Rethinking Repository Services in a Changing Scholarly Communication Landscape
The scholarly communication landscape has changed significantly over the past few years: open access continues to grow, more people expect to be able to read articles for free online, and researchers are creating and disseminating new types of digital scholarship. The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Libraries has seen these changes reflected in our institutional repository (IR), ScholarlyCommons: this past fiscal year saw more than 2 million documents downloaded worldwide and a 280% increase in contributions compared to 4 years ago. Within the last 2 years, management of our IR moved from Collections to a newly formed Digital Scholarship department, which also supports digital humanities, data curation, and GIS. Within this context, the unexpected acquisition of bepress by Elsevier in August opened questions of how to proceed with our suite of library repositories and platforms. In response to this acquisition, and to libraries' experiences with Elsevier in the past, Penn Libraries, a bepress Digital Commons customer, released a statement announcing that we are exploring new options for our IR platform in order to exit bepress ("Operation beprexit"). We see beprexit as an opportunity to rethink the range of repository services we offer our community, taking into consideration the functionality previously offered by bepress, the capacities in the new Samvera-based repository our IT department is developing, and the lessons learned from the rest of the digital scholarship activities, including Data Refuge. This opportunity will allow us to reshape our growing scholarly communications program as we expand to house new types of data and scholarly publications and increase our footprint of open access publications. In this briefing, we will discuss our plan to re-imagine what an IR should and could do and what beprexit means for the larger digital scholarship landscape. We will present the process through which we plan to:
*assess our community needs and capacities
*identify alternatives to bepress
*engage the larger community in this as a collaborative effort


https://beprexit.wordpress.com
http://repository.upenn.edu
https://www.datarefuge.org

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
KW

Kenny Whitebloom

Digital Scholarly Publishing Librarian, University of Pennsylvania
SW

Sarah Wipperman

Scholarly Communications & Digital Repository Librarian, University of Pennsylvania


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Capitol

1:00pm

Digital Preservation: The Fedora Community Approach via Standards and Specifications
Software comes and goes; it's the data that matter. This philosophy has informed our efforts in the Fedora community, particularly over the past year, as we have focused on standardization, specification, and data portability. Foremost amongst these efforts is the formal specification of the Fedora API in order to facilitate interoperability with client applications. At the same time, discussions related to Fedora's role in a digital preservation strategy, including a well-attended panel presentation at the 2016 CNI Fall Member Meeting, have led to a robust import/export utility and a proposal to define a common filesystem layout that specifies how repository resources are structured and stored on disk or in compressed archives. The common thread in all of these efforts is a focus on standardization and common practices that will outlive any particular software implementation. This panel will feature presentations and discussions from representatives of the Fedora community who have participated in these efforts from a variety of institutional perspectives.
http://fedorarepository.org

Speakers
AB

Aaron Birkland

Senior Software Engineer, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Este Pope

Este Pope

Head of Digital Programs, Amherst College
avatar for Evviva Weinraub

Evviva Weinraub

Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies, Northwestern University
Fedora, Samvera, Avalon, and Digital Preservation.
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Embassy

1:00pm

Discovery in 2017: Where Are We Now and Where Do We Want to Be?
Much has been written about library discovery systems; the Renaville bibliography on discovery tools has over 700 entries through 2016. We currently find ourselves in a transition period. This panel presentation will examine the current state-of-the-art of library discovery systems and the role that these systems can play in student and researcher workflows. The panel will examine discovery systems in the context of identified user needs and search behaviors, as revealed in detailed transaction log analyses of user search and clickthrough actions. In the last several years, a number of academic libraries have extended the web-scale discovery systems (WSDS) model by adapting bento style discovery approaches in which search results are partitioned into separate screen result zones (bento boxes) with retrieved content grouped by format or service type. The bento approach is designed to address identified problems with WSDS and meet user needs by optimizing known-item searching, streamlining full-text access, and providing local services, content, and subject specialists. The features and characteristics of 35 bento style systems will be examined in the context of an evidence-based analysis of user needs. Also explored will be the concept of "full library discovery," a phrase first coined by Lorcan Dempsey. Thinking beyond the current array of products, it is important for libraries to examine how evolving scholarly and instructional workflows can better integrate with discovery systems and services.

Speakers
WH

William H. Mischo

Acting Dean of Libraries and University Librarian; Head, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center, University of Illinois
avatar for Eric L Frierson MSI

Eric L Frierson MSI

Director of Field Engineering, North America, EBSCO Information Services
Hey! I'm the team lead for discovery service engineering and integration for EBSCO. This means I can answer any question you might have about integrating EDS or the EDS API into your library and campus. I'm also a developer, building applications that use our API in outside-of... Read More →
avatar for Michael Norman

Michael Norman

Head, Content Access Management, University of Illinois
RS

Roger Schonfeld

Director, Libraries and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Calvert

1:00pm

Facing Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation: The Research Library's Role and Georgetown University's Experience
Georgetown University is undergoing an extensive review of its early connections to American slavery, confronting its past and investigating ways to use its resources to address contemporary issues stemming from slavery. As part of this review, Georgetown University Library spent the past year investigating how to help the University become a world leader in the study of slavery, memory, and reconciliation, ultimately convening a Steering Committee that completed its work in September 2017. The Library Steering Committee's report recommends as its highest priority digitizing the Maryland Province Archives, portions of which chronicle how, why and when the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus sold slaves in 1838. The Jesuits used proceeds from that sale to sustain operations at Georgetown College, the University's predecessor founded in 1789. In this briefing, we will discuss Georgetown's process and then foster a broader dialogue about ways research libraries can leverage their mission and expertise to facilitate the creation of digital collections while simultaneously opening engagement with social, cultural, and racial issues that affect our institutions.


http://slavery.georgetown.edu/report#_ga=2.124144394.1820391193.1507749950-907139397.1504703100
https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/558883

Speakers
avatar for K. Matthew Dames

K. Matthew Dames

Associate University Librarian, Georgetown University
Dr. K. Matthew Dames serves as Georgetown University’s Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Resources and Services, leading a division that includes more than 30 information professionals in both special and principal collections; 3 branch libraries; and the copyright a... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Levine

Melissa Levine

Lead Copyright Officer, Library, University of Michigan


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Governor’s

1:00pm

From Stock to Flows
This session will describe how the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Library is moving away from stock to flows. Stock is knowledge embedded in media that have a low delta of change, whereas flows, such as cutting-edge research, have a high delta of change. Thanks to our profession's roots in print collections, librarians associate static and stable with sustainability, and that association with solid objects was translated into early digital library architectures. In moving from stock to flows we are proposing that it is, in fact, dynamic and mutable architectures that are the most viable for resilient and sustainable services.
Data decoupled from software flows from curated repository applications, is augmented by external data sources, and is stored in a simple, auto-updating Dataset (a Go package for managing JSON documents), against which simple scripts and APIs make the data available to users, serve it up to library applications (websites, harvesters/indexers, analytical tools), and, through batch update scripts, back into repositories. Dataset is highly mutable: regularly refreshed and re-indexed in cycles appropriate to the data source, and easily restructured or reconstructed. This strategy enables the library to minimize costly technology changes and to optimize a small development team by abstracting skillsets from platforms.
Committing to move from stock to flows means disinvesting from pseudo-stock (rented access to journals) while redirecting resources toward Caltech-contextualized stock (institutional bibliography) and open infrastructure. The flows model promotes both library ownership of data (public purpose) with a simultaneous architecture for sharing (public domain), so more closely aligning dynamic data and research outputs generated within the institution to the trusted role of the library in society.
caltechlibrary.github.io/dataset/

Speakers
KA

Kristin Antelman

University Librarian, California Institute of Technology
D

davidkremers

GALCIT, Visitor to Aerospace, California Institute of Technology
SD

Stephen Davison

Head, Digital Library Development, California Institute of Technology


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Congressional A

1:00pm

Prioritizing Researcher Perspectives in Driving Adoption for Research Data Management
"Bridging Communities of Practice: Developing Data Management Tools for Researchers and Service Providers" (Borghi)

Researchers are faced with an evolving array of expectations related to how they manage and share their data. Academic libraries are well positioned to provide research data management (RDM) support owing to their extensive expertise in curating and preserving information. However, researchers and data service providers often have significantly different perceptions and priorities when it comes to research data. To overcome this difficulty, the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library is developing a customizable set of tools that frame data-related practices using language and terminology familiar to researchers. At present, these tools include a rubric that builds upon existing maturity-based tools that enables researchers to self-assess their current practices and a series of guides that provide actionable information about how to comply with current and future data-related requirements. This briefing will cover the development of these tools, how they can be customized for individual disciplinary and institutional communities, and how they can be applied to facilitate communication between researchers and data service providers.

"Where Is the Adoption? Lessons Learned from Researchers about Open Data" (Lowenberg)

While there are many open repositories and policies, adoption still remains low both in publishing and re-using open data. At the California Digital Library, Dash, an open source, standards-based platform for researchers to publish and get credit for their research data, was created to address this challenge. Because our focus has been on adoption, we have found that researchers often do not understand open data-related policies and terminology and generally do not look to the library for help or advice. Researcher requests for features to open up data have also been starkly different from those requested by library, publisher, and institutional stakeholders. Working across the research landscape via interviews, workshops, and user testing at the University of California we have collected what we believe is evidence of what researchers believe is necessary for a greater open data adoption. This session will focus on the stories and requests we collected as well as our implementation in Dash.

Speakers
JB

John Borghi

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library
John Borghi earned his Ph.D. in Integrative Neuroscience from Stony Brook University. As Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences, he will explore issues around preservation and publication of non-traditional scholarly outputs, notably software an... Read More →
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

Research Data Specialist & Product Manager, California Digital Library


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Congressional B

1:00pm

Update on Funding Possibilities, Priorities, and Trends
In this update, representatives from major federal funding agencies and private-sector foundations/non-profits will discuss the current status of programs, goals and processes most relevant to the CNI community, and will offer observations on trends and priorities in the fields they monitor. Ample opportunity will be allowed for audience dialogue.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Barber

Lucy Barber

Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications & Records Commission (NHPRC)
Lucy Barber, Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications and Records Commission (lucy.barber@nara.gov; 202-357-5306, http://www.archives.gov/nhprc) At the Commission, which she joined in 2006, Lucy oversees the grant making process in connection with other progra... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Program Officer, Scholarly Communications, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
avatar for Ashley E. Sands

Ashley E. Sands

Senior Library Program Officer, Institute of Museum and Library Services
avatar for Christa Williford

Christa Williford

Director of Research and Assessment, Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR)
I work on the Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Program in addition to conducting research projects related to other CLIR programs and related initiatives in the HE and cultural heritage sectors. I'm eager to hear about innovative digitization and outreach practi... Read More →
avatar for Joel Wurl

Joel Wurl

Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Always looking to find out what's next. Talk to me about funding opportunities and ideas in the humanities, cultural heritage, digital curation, archives, public/community history sphere.


Tuesday December 12, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Hampton

2:00pm

Break
Tuesday December 12, 2017 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Blue Pre-function

2:15pm

Closing Plenary: Paul Evan Peters Award & Lecture
Scholarly Communication: Deconstruct and Decentralize?


During the 1-year sabbatical I just spent at DANS in The Netherlands, I have familiarized myself with the motivations, standards, and technologies associated with the Decentralized Web movement, especially those that leverage the HTTP protocol stack. During this exercise, I have also explored whether and how these novel approaches could be used as a foundation for a global scholarly commons, and what a minimally viable platform could be. I have closely followed, and at times collaborated with, early career researchers that do pioneering work in this realm. My investigations have led me to believe that – technically – decentralized web approaches can be applied to arrive at a researcher-centric and institution-enabled system in which the core functions of scholarly communication (registration, awareness, certification, archiving) can appropriately be fulfilled. The standards required to arrive at an interoperable, distributed, web-native system are largely in place. The tools that illustrate this potential remain experimental and brittle, yet show a glimpse of a possible future. My enthusiasm regarding these technical opportunities is tempered by a healthy portion of realism regarding the mere possibility of initiating profound change in scholarly communication. My reservations are based on the modest progress that has resulted from a plethora of efforts over the past two decades (some of which I was actively involved in), and on the understanding that global collective action on behalf of academia is required to give a scholarly commons effort the momentum it needs to stand a chance of success. In this talk, I will share a snapshot of my evolving thinking about a future that could be, and hopefully inspire CNI representatives to explore complementary avenues, beyond the technical one that remains my focus.


 https://www.cni.org/go/pep-award/

Speakers
avatar for Herbert Van de Sompel

Herbert Van de Sompel

Research Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Herbert Van de Sompel graduated in Mathematics and Computer Science at Ghent University (Belgium), and in 2000 obtained a Ph.D. in Communication Science there. For many years, he headed Library Automation at Ghent University. After leaving Ghent in 2000, he was Visiting Professor in Computer Science at Cornell University, and Director of e-Strategy and Programmes at the British Library.Currently, he is the team leader of the Prototyping Team at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Team does research regarding various aspects of scholarly communication in the digital age, including information infrastructure, interoperability, digital preservation and indicators for the assessment of the quality of units of scholarly communication. Herbert has played a major role in creating the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH), the Open Archives Initiative Object Reuse... Read More →


Tuesday December 12, 2017 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Blue Room
 

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